Blogs

Accessibility/Usability

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Blogs

Blogs (also known as Weblogs)

Blogs are websites with regular updates and typically combine text, images (graphics or video), and links to other webpages. Blogs are usually informal—taking on the tone of a diary or journal entry. Some blogs are very personal, while others provide mainstream news updates. Most blogs encourage dialogue by allowing their readers to leave comments.

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Browsers

Browsers (also known as Web Browsers)

Available web browsers range in features from minimal, text-based user interfaces with bare-bones support for HTML to rich user interfaces supporting a wide variety of file formats and protocols. Browsers which include additional components to support e-mail, Usenet news, and Internet Relay Chat (IRC), are sometimes referred to as "Internet suites" rather than merely "web browsers." All major web browsers allow the user to open multiple information resources at the same time, either in different browser windows or in different tabs of the same window. Major browsers also include pop-up blockers to prevent unwanted windows from "popping up" without the user's consent.

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CMS

Community Building Tools

 
"Community Building Tools" is a category of Web 2.0 Tools. Click to see the items in the category.
   
CMS

Content Management Systems (CMS)

A content management system (CMS) is a collection of procedures used to manage work flow in a collaborative environment. These procedures can be manual or computer-based. The procedures are designed to allow for a large number of people to contribute to and share stored data; control access to data, based on user roles; aid in easy storage and retrieval of data; reduce repetitive duplicate input; improve the ease of report writing; improve communication between users. In a CMS, data can be defined as nearly anything - documents, movies, pictures, phone numbers, scientific data, etc. CMSs are frequently used for storing, controlling, revising, semantically enriching, and publishing documentation.

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discussion forums

Discussion Forums, Groups and ListServs

 
Discussion forums, groups and listservs have been around since well before Web 2.0 and in fact were the predecessors of a number of the new technologies that comprise Web 2.0 (comment sections, social networks, etc.) As an older technology, these tools still serve as a regular part of many web users' daily diet of information and communications.

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CDC eHealth group on Dailystrength.org

CMS

Document Sharing

Document Sharing allows internet users to create, save, share and revise documents online, as well as allow comments and revisions by other users, which are all stored in one place that is visible to all who have been authorized. This eliminates the problem of version control, where different users have different versions of a document because it has been forwarded to multiple users via email and revised by different users but not coordinated.

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email

E-mail

Next to "Web page," E-mail is perhaps the most widely known, and universally used, Web 1.0 communications tool. While still largely 1.0 in its technology and capabilities, it has grown to include some more advanced features, including HTML formatting with links and rich graphics, and email systems with advanced cataloguing and searching capabilities. What keeps it squarely in the 1.0 category, though, is that it is still mainly a communication tool that works one-way at a time, rather than real-time interactively. This, some say, is why some people have abandoned traditional email altogether in favor of communicating via other, Web 2.0 means such as IM, social networks, mobile platforms and phone-based text messaging.

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CMS

Enhanced Search Tools

"Enhanced Search Tools" is a category of Web 2.0 tools that loosely includes new search technologies, as well as new ways that web developers have been able to incorporate content from different sources into a single web page, essentially doing the search, sort and organize for the reader in one step. These include, for example, web sites that display a map of an area and post links to certain resources on the map. Click to see the items in the category.

 

 

folksonomy

Folksonomy (also known as Social Indexing, Tagging)

A folksonomy is a system of classification derived from the practice and method of collaboratively creating and managing tags to annotate and categorize content; this practice is also known as collaborative tagging, social classification, social indexing, and social tagging. Folksonomy is a portmanteau of folk and taxonomy. Folksonomies became popular on the Web around 2004 as part of social software applications such as social bookmarking and photograph annotation. Tagging, which is one of the defining characteristics of Web 2.0 services, allows users to collectively classify and find information. Some websites include tag clouds as a way to visualize tags in a folksonomy.

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discussion forums

Groups

 
See Discussion Forums
     
discussion forums

Hypertext Markup Language (HTML)

 

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discussion forums

Information Aggregation

 
See RSS Aggregation
     
Instant Messanging

Instant Messaging (IM)

Instant messaging (IM) is a form of real-time direct text-based communication between two or more people using personal computers or other devices, along with shared software clients. The user's text is conveyed over a network, such as the Internet. More advanced instant messaging software clients also allow enhanced modes of communication, such as live voice or video calling.

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  • HelloHealth.com: A site allowing users to communicate with their health provider by IM, text message, and email.
discussion forums

Interactive Web

"Interactive Web" is a category, broadly encompassing Web 2.0 tools that allow users to interact with each other online. Click to see the items in the category.

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discussion forums

Interactive Online Work/Collaboration Tools

"Interactive Online Work/Collaboration Tools" is a category encompassing Web 2.0 tools that allow users to share their work with each other online. Click to see the items in the category.

 

 

discussion forums

Mash-Ups

A mashup is a website that combines data from more than one source into a single integrated tool. Data sources often include maps (such as Google Maps) and databases (such as business locations). Mashups depend on organizations sharing data. They also depend on software developers to create programs that can work together.

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discussion forums

Microblogging

You can think of Twitter as a “micro-blog.” You use your computer or mobile phone to broadcast short messages, or “tweets,” that are limited to 140 characters. People can sign up on Twitter to follow your tweets. You can choose to follow people and will receive their tweets, too.

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discussion forums

Mobile Internet

The Mobile Web refers to browser-based access to the Internet or web applications using a mobile device - such as a smartphone - connected to a wireless network. 'Mobile Internet' refers to access to the Internet from a mobile device, such as a smartphone or laptop via integrated capabilities or via an independent device (such as a USB modem or PCMCIA card). Today USB modems are HSPA (3.5G) modems. Many users "tether" their smartphones to their laptop or personal computer with the wireless device providing access to the Internet via 3G, GPRS or CSD.

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discussion forums

Mobile Web

"Mobile Web" is a category of Web 2.0 tools, referring to browser-based access to the Internet or web applications using a mobile device - such as a smartphone - connected to a wireless network. Click to see the items in the category.

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discussion forums

Online Audio

 
See Podcasts
     
discussion forums

Online Document Mark-up

 
See Document Sharing
     
discussion forums

Online Photo Editing

 
See Photo Sharing
     
discussion forums

Online Scheduling and Task Management

First it was your pocket calendar, then it was your Personal Digital Assistant, which evolved so that you could sync it with the calendar on your desktop. Now, scheduling has moved online so that you can maintain your calendar from anywhere you have internet access, including on your desktop, laptop, and mobile devices (smartphones, netbooks, iPods and iPads). Everything goes to the source online and syncs, so that all calendars in all places have the same data. Additionally, software developers have developed task management functionality that allows users to add, sort, prioritize and status-check tasks. Also, some businesses and organizations are allowing customers to schedule appointments online, which sync with the user's various calendar devices. The to-do list has never been more dynamic.

 

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discussion forums

Online Streaming Media

"Online Streaming Media" is a category of Web 2.0 tools, referring to software programs and web-based applications that allow users to listen to audio and watch video in real-time or to download it for use at a later time. Click to see the items in the category.
 
     
discussion forums

Online Video Editing

 
See Video Sharing
     
discussion forums

Photo Sharing

Photo sharing sites allow you to share digital photographs, scanned photographs, and other graphics online with your friends, family, colleagues and the general public. These sites share much in common with online social networking sites, such as Facebook and MySpace, in that users can connect with each other, send messages, leave comments, and share photos.

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discussion forums

Podcasts

A podcast (or netcast) is a series of digital media files (either audio or video) that are released episodically and often downloaded through web syndication. The mode of delivery differentiates podcasting from other means of accessing media files over the Internet, such as direct download, or streamed webcasting. A list of all the audio or video files currently associated with a given series is maintained centrally on the distributor's server as a web feed, and the listener or viewer employs special client application software known as a podcatcher that can access this web feed, check it for updates, and download any new files in the series. This process can be automated so that new files are downloaded automatically. Files are stored locally on the user's computer or other device ready for offline use, giving simple and convenient access to episodic content. (Wikipedia)

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discussion forums

Real Simple Syndication (RSS)

“RSS” stands for “Real Simple Syndication.” RSS feeds are a way for blogs and websites to distribute their content to people automatically. As an RSS feed subscriber, you can subscribe to a particular website, just like you would subscribe to a newspaper, and you will be notified when that site has new content. As an RSS content originator, changes to your blog or website will be broadcast automatically to subscribers, driving traffic to the site with little or no additional effort.

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discussion forums

RSS Aggregation

In general internet terms, a news aggregation website is a website where headlines are collected, usually manually, by the website owner. In computing, a feed aggregator, also known as a feed reader, news reader, rss reader or simply aggregator, is client software or a Web application which aggregates syndicated web content such as news headlines, blogs, podcasts, and vlogs in a single location for easy viewing.

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discussion forums

Screencasting

 
See Web Conferencing
     
discussion forums

Search Engines

A web search engine is designed to search for information on the World Wide Web. The search results are usually presented in a list of results and are commonly called hits. The information may consist of web pages, images, information and other types of files. Some search engines also mine data available in databases or open directories. Unlike Web directories, which are maintained by human editors, search engines operate algorithmically or are a mixture of algorithmic and human input. (Wikipedia)

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discussion forums

Smartphone Apps

A smartphone is a mobile phone that offers more advanced computing ability and connectivity than a standard cellular phone, allowing the user to install and run more advanced applications that make the phone operate more like a miniature laptop computer. Several smartphone vendors have established “app stores” that allow users to purchase applications that run from business functional to downright whimsical, and a culture of “app developers” has grown around the industry, resulting in a marketplace where almost any need can be met with an app, and almost any function can be carried out on the user’s cell phone.

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discussion forums

Social Bookmarking

Social bookmarking is a method for Internet users to share, organize, search, and manage bookmarks of web resources. Unlike file sharing, the resources themselves aren't shared, merely bookmarks that reference them. Descriptions may be added to these bookmarks in the form of metadata, so that other users may understand the content of the resource without first needing to download it for themselves. Such descriptions may be free text comments, votes in favor of or against its quality, or tags that collectively or collaboratively become a folksonomy. Folksonomy is also called social tagging, "the process by which many users add metadata in the form of keywords to shared content".[1]

In a social bookmarking system, users save links to web pages that they want to remember and/or share. These bookmarks are usually public, and can be saved privately, shared only with specified people or groups, shared only inside certain networks, or another combination of public and private domains. The allowed people can usually view these bookmarks chronologically, by category or tags, or via a search engine. Most social bookmark services encourage users to organize their bookmarks with informal tags instead of the traditional browser-based system of folders, although some services feature categories/folders or a combination of folders and tags. They also enable viewing bookmarks associated with a chosen tag, and include information about the number of users who have bookmarked them.

Some social bookmarking services also draw inferences from the relationship of tags to create clusters of tags or bookmarks. Many social bookmarking services provide web feeds for their lists of bookmarks, including lists organized by tags. This allows subscribers to become aware of new bookmarks as they are saved, shared, and tagged by other users. As these services have matured and grown more popular, they have added extra features such as ratings and comments on bookmarks, the ability to import and export bookmarks from browsers, emailing of bookmarks, web annotation, and groups or other social network features.

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discussion forums

Social Networks

Social network sites are online communities that give you opportunities to connect with, or provide resources to, clients, colleagues, family, and friends who share common interests. In each social network, you create a profile that describes you or your organization, and then invite people to join you as “friends” or “fans.” There are many different types of social network sites, many of which are free, and they range from general to those tailored for a specific demographic or interest area. Social network sites allow you to engage with people who share similar interests or are a part of your organization’s target audience. Many social network sites allow you to upload videos, photos, create a blog, post events, join groups, and send messages.

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discussion forums

Streaming Audio

 
See Podcasts
     
discussion forums

Streaming Video

 
See Video Sharing
     
discussion forums

Tagging

 
See Folksonomy
     
discussion forums

Text Messaging (SMS)

Text messaging is most widely used by individuals to communicate with each other with short messages over their mobile phone devices, but organizations have begun to use text messages to communicate with broader communities, most often in the form of an alert. Cities, towns and universities use text messaging to distribute timely alerts to a broad swath of people. Many public health departments are using the technology to alert residents of public health problems, and some health providers are beginning to use text messaging to remind patients of appointments and medication schedules.

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discussion forums

Video Conferencing

Videoconferencing uses telecommunications of audio and video to bring people at different sites together for a meeting. This can be as simple as a conversation between two people in private offices (point-to-point) or involve several sites (multi-point) with more than one person in large rooms at different sites. Besides the audio and visual transmission of meeting activities, videoconferencing can be used to share documents, computer-displayed information, and whiteboards.

 

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discussion forums

Video Sharing

Video sharing sites allow you to view and share videos online with friends, family, colleagues and the general public. These sites share much in common with photo sharing and online social networking sites in that users can connect with each other, send messages, leave comments, and link to related videos.

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discussion forums

Virtual Worlds/Virtual Reality

A virtual world is a computer-based, simulated reality or fantasy environment where people can socialize, connect, and create in an infinite number of ways. Participants can develop digital representations of themselves, known as avatars. In a virtual world, you can be whoever (or whatever) you want to be. People use virtual worlds to connect people with similar interests. Typically, people use virtual worlds for entertainment, but a growing number of educational institutions and businesses are using them as training and teaching tools.

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discussion forums

Web Browsers

 
See Browsers
 
discussion forums

Web Conferencing, Webinars, Online Classrooms, and Online Proceedings Archiving

Web conferencing is used to conduct live meetings, training, or presentations via the Internet. In a web conference, each participant sits at his or her own computer and is connected to other participants via the internet. This can be either a downloaded application on each of the attendees' computers or a web-based application where the attendees access the meeting by clicking on a link distributed by e-mail (meeting invitation) to enter the conference. A webinar is a neologism to describe a specific type of web conference. It is typically one-way, from the speaker to the audience with limited audience interaction, such as in a webcast. A webinar can be collaborative and include polling and question & answer sessions to allow full participation between the audience and the presenter. In some cases, the presenter may speak over a standard telephone line, while pointing out information being presented onscreen, and the audience can respond over their own telephones, speaker phones allowing the greatest comfort and convenience. There are web conferencing technologies on the market that have incorporated the use of VoIP audio technology, to allow for a completely web-based communication. Depending upon the provider, webinars may provide hidden or anonymous participant functionality, making participants unaware of other participants in the same meeting. For interactive online workshops web conferences are complemented by electronic meeting systems (EMS) which provide a range of online facilitation tools such as brainstorming and categorization, a range of voting methods or structured discussions, typically with optional anonymity. Typically, EMS do not provide core web conferencing functionality such as screen sharing or voice conferencing though some EMS can control web conferencing sessions. In the early years of the Internet, the terms "web conferencing" was often used to describe a group discussion in a message board and therefore not live. The term has evolved to refer specifically to live or "synchronous" meetings. (Wikipedia)

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discussion forums

Weblogs

 
See Blogs
 
discussion forums

Wikis

The term “wiki” comes from the Hawaiian word for “fast.” Wiki technology creates a webpage that anyone with access to it can modify, quickly and easily. A wiki is essentially a webpage with an edit button. A wiki allows you to collaborate with others online easily. You can make wikis public or password-protected. Users can add pages or documents to a wiki and edit them—and you can view changes made by different users or roll back to previous versions. Wikis reduce the potential confusion of having multiple contributors to documents or projects.

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